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Geometric Animals Come to Life in DIY Lamp Kits by OWL

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OWL, a Libson-based lamp brand founded by two architects in 2016, offers a wide range of friendly wild animals that can be turned into volumetric lamps using simple folding techniques. As you might guess, OWL offers a few different owl designs, as well as roaring hippos, curious rabbits, and proud penguins. Hugo Formiga and Teresa Almeida, the designers behind OWL, explain to Colossal that their “most recent designs have focused on large, endangered mammals. The selection tends to raise awareness about wildlife and simultaneously recreates the animals in a playful and abstract manner.The designs seem to trigger stories about themselves and are conceived as fun lighting objects with a hint of personality.”  You can find their range of DIY kits on Etsy. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Guybrush
39 days ago
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Han ! Need *_*
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Headlights Cut Through Dense Fog in Moody Images of Cars at Night by Henri Prestes

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They Drive by Night is an ongoing series by photographer Henri Prestes that captures the unsettling feeling of driving through the dim and deserted countryside at night. His darkened landscapes are lit almost exclusively by headlights, and are shrouded in dense fog. The series was photographed near remote villages and forests throughout Portugal and Spain, where the photographer was raised and explored at a young age.

“I started thinking about putting this project together during some night traveling, thinking about how exciting and scary it is traveling alone in secluded places with only the headlights to guide us through the immense darkness ahead,” Prestes tells Colossal. “At the same time I was trying to come up with a cinematic series about exploring the narrative possibilities of a single still frame, using weather conditions as a way to affect the emotional state of a photograph.” You can see more of his night-based images on his website and Instagram. (via Faith is Torment)

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Guybrush
47 days ago
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A 10-Ton Copper Staircase Designed by CEBRA Floats Above Copenhagen’s Redesigned Experimentarium Museum

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All images © CEBRA and photographer Adam Mørk

A twisting set of floating copper staircases intertwine at the main entrance of Copenhagen’s new science and technology center, the Experimentarium. The museum, and its four-story Helix staircases, were designed by Danish architecture studio CEBRA who wanted to create a subtle nod to the institution’s science-based curriculum. The design is an abstract version of a DNA strand’s composition at an extraordinary scale. At over 300 feet long, the staircase includes 20,000 pounds of copper and 320,000 pounds of steel.

CEBRA won an international architecture competition to design the building in 2011. In addition to doubling the exhibition space of the Experimentarium’s original building, the re-design also includes a roof terrace, new staff facilities overlooking the museum, and convention center, and a large cafe and picnic area. You can see more images of the build-out, and CEBRA’s designs on their website and Instagram. (via ArchDaily)

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Guybrush
54 days ago
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Breakfast

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Guybrush
72 days ago
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1 public comment
sirshannon
71 days ago
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"chips" is the strangest mitchspelling of "Chick-fil-A" I've seen.

Larger-Than-Life Animals Terrorize Suburban Towns in Paintings by John Brosio

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"State of the Union 2" (2014), Oil on canvas, 40.25 x 68 inches

“State of the Union 2” (2014), Oil on canvas, 40.25 x 68 inches

The paintings of John Brosio feel incredibly cinematic, as if each is a still from a contemporary horror film paused at a striking moment of tension. Brosio paints enlarged birds, crabs, and Big Gulp containers poised against the American suburban sprawl. The animals and objects hover over fast food chains and car repair shops, looking as if they might strike what lies below at any moment, or simply continue their crusade in an alternate direction. A humor creeps into the paintings when we remember the actual issues our contemporary society and climate face—if presented with the option would we rather choose invasion by iguana?

“The success of a painting in the end has so little to do with subject matter but compels us rather with how well it codifies the way in which things relate to one another in this universe,” he explains in his bio. “I think of painting as the pursuit of realizing some degree of surrender to these sensibilities through an orchestration of select relationships.”

His works have been considered “anxious realism” and seem to point to an particularly poignant American unease. You can see more of Brosio’s tension-filled and dangerous landscapes on his website and Instagram. (via Faithwaites)

"Quixote 2000" (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 39 inches

“Quixote 2000” (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 39 inches

"Edge of Town 16" (2018), Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

“Edge of Town 16” (2018), Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

"Edge of Town 13" (2015), Oil on canvas, 39 x 62 inches

“Edge of Town 13” (2015), Oil on canvas, 39 x 62 inches

"Progress" (2015), Oil on canvas, 36 x 36 inches

“Progress” (2015), Oil on canvas, 36 x 36 inches

"State of the Union" (2011), Oil on canvas, 41 x 66 inches

“State of the Union” (2011), Oil on canvas, 41 x 66 inches

"Whole Foods" (2011), Oil on canvas, 24 x 46 inches

“Whole Foods” (2011), Oil on canvas, 24 x 46 inches

"Bar" (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

“Bar” (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

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Guybrush
75 days ago
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Noted.

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Guybrush
78 days ago
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