596 stories
·
6 followers

Breakfast

1 Comment and 5 Shares

Read the whole story
Guybrush
14 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
sirshannon
13 days ago
reply
"chips" is the strangest mitchspelling of "Chick-fil-A" I've seen.

Larger-Than-Life Animals Terrorize Suburban Towns in Paintings by John Brosio

2 Shares
"State of the Union 2" (2014), Oil on canvas, 40.25 x 68 inches

“State of the Union 2” (2014), Oil on canvas, 40.25 x 68 inches

The paintings of John Brosio feel incredibly cinematic, as if each is a still from a contemporary horror film paused at a striking moment of tension. Brosio paints enlarged birds, crabs, and Big Gulp containers poised against the American suburban sprawl. The animals and objects hover over fast food chains and car repair shops, looking as if they might strike what lies below at any moment, or simply continue their crusade in an alternate direction. A humor creeps into the paintings when we remember the actual issues our contemporary society and climate face—if presented with the option would we rather choose invasion by iguana?

“The success of a painting in the end has so little to do with subject matter but compels us rather with how well it codifies the way in which things relate to one another in this universe,” he explains in his bio. “I think of painting as the pursuit of realizing some degree of surrender to these sensibilities through an orchestration of select relationships.”

His works have been considered “anxious realism” and seem to point to an particularly poignant American unease. You can see more of Brosio’s tension-filled and dangerous landscapes on his website and Instagram. (via Faithwaites)

"Quixote 2000" (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 39 inches

“Quixote 2000” (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 39 inches

"Edge of Town 16" (2018), Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

“Edge of Town 16” (2018), Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

"Edge of Town 13" (2015), Oil on canvas, 39 x 62 inches

“Edge of Town 13” (2015), Oil on canvas, 39 x 62 inches

"Progress" (2015), Oil on canvas, 36 x 36 inches

“Progress” (2015), Oil on canvas, 36 x 36 inches

"State of the Union" (2011), Oil on canvas, 41 x 66 inches

“State of the Union” (2011), Oil on canvas, 41 x 66 inches

"Whole Foods" (2011), Oil on canvas, 24 x 46 inches

“Whole Foods” (2011), Oil on canvas, 24 x 46 inches

"Bar" (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

“Bar” (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

Read the whole story
Guybrush
17 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

Noted.

1 Share
Read the whole story
Guybrush
20 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

Black and White Analog Photographs Explore the Serenity of Long Meandering Roads

3 Shares

Swedish photographer Håkan Strand works with old analog cameras and black and white film to capture landscapes that exude the serenity of a time past. The photographs often center around rural roads and explore the stillness that exists when one reaches the fringes of civilization. His recently published book Silent Moments will soon be available to purchase on his website, where you can find further studies of back roads and long desert highways in landscapes in the US, UK, and throughout Scandinavia. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

Read the whole story
Guybrush
54 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

4D-Printed Aquatic Plants Spring to Life in “Hydrophytes” by Nicole Hone

1 Share

Using modeling software and multi-material 3D printing, industrial designer Nicole Hone created a series of 4D-printed futuristic aquatic plants, or Hydrophytes, that are as full of character as the natural organisms they mimic. In the film of the same name, the hydrophytes are activated by pneumatic inflation in water, and transform into dynamic organisms that you could swear were actually alive.

“I have always been fascinated with nature,” the designer tells Colossal. “It inspires my design ideas and aesthetic. For this project, I became particularly interested in botany and marine life. I was amazed by the way sea creatures and corals moved, and I wanted to reflect similar qualities in my designs.” While working on her Master of Design Innovation thesis at Victoria University of Wellington, Hone learned about plans to redesign the National Aquarium in New Zealand. She thought that it would be interesting to develop a “future-focused exhibition” with moving models as an interactive installation for visitors. She began making test prints and discovered that the models moved best in water, which eventually became the pieces used in Hydrophytes.

Hone explains that software was used to create the shape, surface texture, and internal structures for the Hydrophytes. One benefit of the 3D printing system is that there can be a varying degree of hardness for the parts, but the machine can still handle printing them as a seamless object. During printing the works are encased in a support material, which Hone has to then painstakingly remove (sometimes a 4-hour process) by soaking them in water and using a toothpick. After cleaning, air is passed through the CGOs (computer generated objects) and they are placed in the underwater environments.

“They can respond to external forces such as gravity, water ripples or currents, and interaction with people or other 3D prints in real life,” Hone said. “Their man-made composite materials behave uncannily similar to living organisms.”

She went onto explain that each Hydrophyte has a unique character that is defined by both their style of movement and appearance. The colored lights that illuminate the printed plants were chosen to “complement each personality and amplify the emotive qualities of the film,” and the functions of each plant were inspired by the effects of climate change on marine species. “As the 4D printing experiments developed from abstract shapes into more plant-like models, their appearance and movement helped me think of which function would best suit each character,” she added. It’s fascinating to see the intersection of art and technology produce such a unique collection of objects. To view more of what Hone has created with her research, visit her website. (via Designboom)

Read the whole story
Guybrush
63 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

http://webcomicname.com/post/177768064084

1 Share
Read the whole story
Guybrush
74 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories