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City Lights Cast an Aura of Anonymous Mystique Over Keita Morimoto’s Streetscapes

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A painting of a light illuminating a city street with a few people

All images © Keita Morimoto, shared with permission

In Keita Morimoto’s paintings, soft yellow streetlights, LED shop signs, and clinical beams of a public transit stop expose the discomfiting nature of perpetual surveillance. Working in acrylic and oil, the Japanese artist explores the scenes of daily commutes, walks with friends, and trips to a vending machine. He shrouds his streets with shadows that add a mysterious aura to the works, a feeling bolstered by the anonymity of the places and people.

Morimoto refrains from incorporating distinct symbols, markings, or features that would identify and situate the locations within a specific cultural and geographical context and prefers, instead, to consider how many of the ails of modern life are ubiquitous. “In today’s society, many people suffer from the difficulty of living,” he says. While issues of surveillance, consumerism, and a desire for fast-paced production often dominate today’s world, the artist focuses on the pockets of calm, beauty, and magic to be found around every street corner.

Currently, Morimoto has works on view at Powerlong Museum in Shanghai and will be included in upcoming shows with Kotaro Nukaga in Tokyo and The Hole in New York. Find more of his enigmatic pieces on his site and Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

A painting of a vending machine illuminating a city street with a few people

A painting of a train station illuminating a stop with a few people

A painting of a vending machine illuminating a city street with a few people

A painting of an illuminated city street with a few people

A painting of a vending machine and store illuminating a city street

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article City Lights Cast an Aura of Anonymous Mystique Over Keita Morimoto’s Streetscapes appeared first on Colossal.

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Guybrush
10 days ago
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Global carbon emissions at record levels with no signs of shrinking, new data shows

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Global carbon emissions at record levels with no signs of shrinking, new data shows:

Global carbon dioxide emissions from all human activities remain at record highs in 2022, and fossil fuel emissions have risen above pre-pandemic levels, according to a new analysis by an international body of scientists.

The analysis, by the Global Carbon Project, calculates Earth’s “carbon budget”, which is how much CO₂ humans have released, and how much has been removed from the atmosphere by the oceans and land ecosystems. From there, we calculate how much carbon can still be emitted into the atmosphere before Earth exceeds the crucial 1.5℃ global warming threshold.

This year, the world is projected to emit 40.6 billion tons of CO₂ from all human activities, leaving 380 billion tons of CO₂ as the remaining carbon budget. This amount of emissions is disastrous for the climate—at current levels, there is a 50% chance the planet will reach the 1.5℃ global average temperature rise in just nine years.

Continue Reading.

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Guybrush
14 days ago
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Mysterious Creatures Emerge from Recycled Materials in Sculptures by Spencer Hansen

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Two sculptures by Spencer Hansen in the snowy mountains near Aspen, Colorado.

“BADU” and “FINCH” in collaboration with Jason Siegel. All images © Spencer Hansen, shared with permission

Long-legged creatures don otherwordly masks in sculptures by Bali-based artist Spencer Hansen, whose work explores identity and connection through a cast of uncanny characters. Using primarily natural, found, and recycled materials like wood, metal, bone, plant fibers, and ceramic, he draws inspiration from surrounding environment and frequent travels. Originally from Idaho, he relocated to Bali where he built a workshop that houses studios and live-work space for a team of skilled artisans who help to bring the pieces to life.

Alongside business partner Shayne Maratea, with whom he founded independent clothing and art company BLAMO, Hansen often collaborates with artists and photographers to merge sculpture and performance. Intended to inspire curiosity and play, the characters are carved and assembled in a variety of scales, from toy-like figurines to life-size suits, with mysterious faces that resemble shamanic masks.

Hansen has a solo exhibition opening in December at Spencer Lynne Galleries in Dallas, and you can find more of his work on his website and Instagram.

 

A sculpture by Spencer Hansen of a bat-like mask.

“BOBA”

A sculpture by Spencer Hansen of a fuzzy suit with a metallic, faceless mask.

“Eternal Embrace” collaboration with Naomi Samara. Suit worn by Aleph Geddis. Hands: Naomi Samara, Chantal Ka, and Shayne Maratea

Two sculptural figures by Spencer Hansen.

Left: “EQUUS.” Right: “Tikus”

A group of wooden, abstracted, figurative sculptures by Spencer Hansen.

Two mask sculptures by Spencer Hansen.

Left: Head of “LELA.” Right: “M11 Topeng Barat”

Artist Spencer Hansen standing next to a life-size sculpture with a bat-like mask, all in white.

“LELA”

Three wooden mask-like sculptures by Spencer Hansen.

“M11,” “M12,” and “M13”

A group of ceramic sculptures by Spencer Hansen in progress with carving materials.

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Mysterious Creatures Emerge from Recycled Materials in Sculptures by Spencer Hansen appeared first on Colossal.

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Guybrush
18 days ago
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Expressive Wildlife Portraits are Captured in Elegant Scrap Metal Sculptures by Leah Jeffery

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All images shared with permission © Leah Jeffery. Photographs by Katie Jeffery

When it comes to scrap metal, Hogansville, Georgia-based artist Leah Jeffery has honed an instinct for transforming old bike parts, cutlery, and offcuts into a captivating menagerie of expressive animals. During her senior year of high school, she began exploring different trades, and after signing up for a welding class, discovered a natural skill with metalworking. She became interested in re-using discarded materials, and her first project was a great horned owl, which spurred an ongoing series portraying an array of wildlife.

Now working as Bruised Reed Studio, her practice centers around the proverbial turning of trash into treasure. “There is something about taking what was discarded and giving it new life,” she says. “I use any scrap metal I can find—mostly old bicycle parts and flatware, or people will give me their random metal junk.” Each sculpture is one-of-a-kind, formed from in a wide variety of textures, densities, and patinas to expressively capture an eagle’s intense gaze, a butterfly’s wings, or a sloth’s lazy grin.

You can follow Bruised Reed Studio on Instagram, and find more work on her website.

 



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Guybrush
32 days ago
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Aerial Photos Highlight the Rugged, Textured Topographies of the American Badlands

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All images © Tobias Hägg, shared with permission

Awash in pale blue light or the glimmers of dusk and dawn, the dry, eroded terrains of the American West appear as otherworldly vistas in the works of Stockholm-based photographer Tobias Hägg (previously). Captured in spring of this year, the aerial images peer down on or out across the vast, rugged landscapes known as badlands. These regions are replete with geological formations and terrain diversity, and Hägg spotlights such shifts in elevation and soil by documenting the rippling, ravine crevices and buttes that overlook the area. Light and shadow dramatize the images and accentuate the textures and depth of the extraordinarily craggy topographies.

Prints of Hägg’s images are available in his shop, and you can find more from photographer, including new a forthcoming book comprising a decade’s worth of work, on Behance and Instagram.

 



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Guybrush
58 days ago
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Explosive Photos by Ray Collins Capture the Ocean’s Mercurial Nature As It Erupts in Extravagant Bursts

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“VII.” All images © Ray Collins, shared with permission

Ever fickle, the ocean and all its excitable energy provide endless fodder for Ray Collins (previously). The Australian photographer, who is based in Wollongong, is known for his dramatic images that capture the diversity of textures and forms that emerge from the water. Waves undulate into scaly walls, fine mists erupt in the air, and surges turn in on themselves, creating eerie, patterned tunnels. Each image emphasizes the capricious nature of the water, which Collins shares as the impetus for his practice. “I’m fortunate that my subject, the ocean, is never the same. There are always new emotions and feelings to capture. As long as I show up with a blank slate I will find new and beautiful moments,” he says.

Collins has several books and prints available on his site, and you can find a massive archive of his photos on Instagram.

 

“Tree of Life”

“Siren”

“Scales”

Left: “Aberrant.” Right: “Convergence”

“Matter”

Left: “Fortitude.” Right: “Cauldron”

“Rumble”



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Guybrush
59 days ago
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